via flickr/UweRichterPhotography

Following a calendar is inevitable –everyone has a schedule to keep. Specific days and times are regularly reserved for school, work, exercise and even reading. Seemingly there is no time for random activities or experiences.
Where’s the time for spontaneity? Does scheduling spontaneity not make it spontaneous? The opportunity for spontaneity is everywhere. Preparing an itinerary for amusement is not necessary –spontaneity simply requires following the occasional impulse to veer off routine. Hence, a schedule does not kill spontaneity- what kills it is taking the extra time in between responsibilities and overly spending them on worrying, watching TV, browsing the internet, texting and other unimportant activities that eventually lead you to wonder “what if?”

via flickr/micurs
via flickr/micurs

Worrying away free time keeps the mind moving in a direction that just fosters more worry. Thinking about having to go straight to sleep in order to wake up at seven in the morning while requiring at least six hours of sleep, just causes you not to be able to fall asleep because of that worry.  Over-thinking and over-planning keeps your mind busy –too busy to realize that time is passing regardless of whether or not you get sleep or do everything on your vacation to-do list. Instead try to be okay with not always meeting such self-imposed deadlines. Having that mindset will allow for relaxation, leaving more room for exploration, first time experiences, and actually acting on the inexplicable urge to dance in the electronic aisles at Target.

Instant video and on-demand video have helped and hurt this generation. With Netflix allowing subscribers access to easy entertainment, it grants movie buffs and fans of popular TV shows to save time on going to rental spots, few of which even exist any more because of Netflix. It also prevents having to purchase the Blu-ray or DVD helping to save some money and still be able to watch that movie whenever you want. However, Netflix is also at the helm of the binge-watching epidemic. Binge watching often lures this generation to concede to hours upon hours in front of a screen. Some of those hours could easily be spent taking a risk that steers away from comfort zones –or simply leaving the next episode of “House of Cards” for tomorrow because of a sudden desire to take a drive.

via flickr/Marit & Toomas Hinnosaar
via flickr/Marit & Toomas Hinnosaar

The internet and social media is another aspect on the benefit/burden spectrum of the era. While social media allows us to communicate at large, it also prevents from in-person communication and connection with family, real friends and with moments themselves. We learn and gain inspiration from these sources, yet spending too much time hoping and wishing about all the adventures and fun to be had, takes away from the opportunities to put them into action. Instagram and Twitter keeps us posted and updated on cool events, intriguing locations and quotes encouraging a thirst for adventure. The idea of wanderlust is all over Intstagram, yet most people fail to try to make their own posts about wanderlust. If everyone began instantly acting with their heart, gut and daydreams, then life would be just as magical as those random breathtaking pictures they click on and “like.”

Some of the most alluring stories are the ones that occur unexpectedly. Just go with the flow, and let yourself be unpredictable. Always planning, staying-in, assuming the spectator role or worrying about age, money and time does not get you moving. Instead, take little steps. Taking a trip to Greece tomorrow may not be easily accessible, but the scale of the adventure does not matter so long as you instinctively explore. Ponder this: when was the last time you did something spontaneous? If you can’t recall, then it’s been too long.

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